The Award-Winning Process for Association Innovation

Smooth The Path

When we are tired of the tension it may help to borrow the playbook from an innovative company. IDEO, the innovation experts, have a process that makes for a good example because it not only works but also because it has been extensively shared so we know the method behind the magic.

How to Leverage Your Association’s Super-Members

Smooth The Path

The trouble with association boards is they tend to be populated with super-members. Super-members are members who are so engaged, so seasoned, so advanced in the profession or industry they are not like most members. Don’t ask them to guess what new members need or want.

Whose Feedback Matters Most to the Future of the Association?

Smooth The Path

Related: Identify innovating members. We should value the members who value the association the most. Is the association providing enough value to long-time members? The post Whose Feedback Matters Most to the Future of the Association? appeared first on Smooth The Path.

Our Members are Self-Centered

Smooth The Path

Our members are self-centered. Our members have… no time. Only organizations that solve our member’s problems, speak their language, and understand them will get their time and attention. Can you stand in your member’s shoes and do this?

Differentiating Between Member Feedback and Member Criticism

Smooth The Path

Each time you offer members something new you have a choice. You can listen to the feedback from those members who are all in. Member feedback helps the new change or product reach its fullest potential. What is your association’s take on member feedback?

When Members Believe the Association is Their Cause

Smooth The Path

From the outside, this association is very much like many others; there are members, chapters, special interest groups, and conferences. When the association needed a new website a member lead the refresh. A team of members is putting together a new product plan.

Is it Day 1 or Day 2 for Associations?

Smooth The Path

True customer (member) obsession and high-velocity decision making are the most critical but also the most difficult for associations. Think about your members. Think about your best members. Not board members but regular members who are highly engaged.

The CEO’s Guide to Association Innovation

Association Adviser

When I say the word innovation to you, what feelings does this word evoke? In a recent research study association professionals reported that innovation is synonymous with risk, big expectations, large investments, long commitments and failure. Innovative projects fall on a continuum.

A Cheaper, Faster Way to Conduct Your Member Listening Tour

Smooth The Path

Imagine what you can learn by listening to your members share their thoughts, ideas, goals, and problems. The post A Cheaper, Faster Way to Conduct Your Member Listening Tour appeared first on Smooth The Path.

Mind the Member Gap

Smooth The Path

When I talk to relatively new members there is almost always a 3-5 year gap between when the member started in the profession or industry and when they actually became a member of the association. Members get value when we help them solve their problem.

Common Trap for Association Professionals

Smooth The Path

” This happens all the time in association leadership because we are coming at everything with a different perspective than our members. We think, “man, we killed ourselves to get as many responses as we did, this member should go out and recruit more respondents like her.”

Why We Might Be Interpreting Our Association’s Data All Wrong

Smooth The Path

Our assumptions about our members can be wrong. We see the data footprints members leave in their wake, the renewals, the ways they engaged, the content they read. The only way to overcome this bias is to find out what is driving our member’s actions, goals, fears, and challenges.

Members Who Share Their Opinions Expect Action (here is what we are going to do!)

Smooth The Path

Our members won’t want to give 45-minutes to hour of their time for an interview is a common worry among many association executives. But I find that members actually do. The good news is these are exactly the members we most need to talk to. Members want to be heard.

Developing My Dream Association

Smooth The Path

If I were to build an association, I would pull the most significant insights from all of the research I have conducted. One of the core staff values would be to be intensely member-focused. We would talk with members often, conduct listening tours, and interview them.

Turning Our Members’ Problems into Opportunities

Smooth The Path

Members want us to solve problems that they can’t solve for themselves – Greg Melia , Director of Membership for ASAE at MASAE’s 2015 mid-year conference. We solve the problems that nag our members, problems that no one else cared to solve or could solve.

Case Study: In-depth Member Interviews Feed Association’s Strategic Plan

Smooth The Path

What else should the association do to support members during these extremely challenging times? Based on this input we outlined two goals for the research project: Understand member’s current challenges. Learn if there were any barriers preventing deeper member engagement.

Association Brain Food Weekly: 3.22.19

Reid All About it

Your new member onboarding shouldn’t just be show and tell , says Billhighway. They suggest working with your chapters on an onboarding plan that helps you learn about new members’ needs, introduce them to the chapter and association, and guide them onto the most relevant membership path.

We Should Value Members Who Value the Association the Most

Smooth The Path

Here’s an unpopular view: association staff should focus most on those members who value the association the most. These companies define arch-types and use that arch-type when talking about new strategic, marketing or innovation plans.

Association Brain Food Weekly: 6.13.16

Reid All About it

Hear how the National Association of Tax Professionals used Google Universal Analytics to uncover insights they previously only made assumptions about, and how the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association streamlined their business processes with Google Tag Manager.

System 130

Association Brain Food Weekly: 6.6.16

Reid All About it

Learn how to apply event design thinking using the #EventCanvas, a practical visual language and innovation process to describe, challenge, and design high-stakes events. Join AENC affiliate members to discuss: How are you marketing your company and/or yourself?

3 Ways to Get Members to Read Your Marketing Communications

SocialFish

Same with your members they think much of what you send to them does not apply to them. Here’s why your members may not be responding to your marketing communications: Use their words. Not using your member’s words sets you apart making trust that much harder.

How Are Associations Using Twitter?

SocialFish

While all of these things are important for our members to know perhaps pushing all of the time is not so engaging. Instead of just pushing messages through Twitter here are some other ways to use this social media channel that may help you serve your members.

The Marketing of Marketing is not Telling Us The Whole Story About Member Research

SocialFish

Technology promises to give us unprecedented access to our members’ hearts and minds but does it really deliver? When you first step into a marketing role at an organization with few member insights, start with the data. We may start to repel members instead of attracting them.

The Marketing of Marketing is not Telling Us The Whole Story About Member Research

SocialFish

Technology promises to give us unprecedented access to our members’ hearts and minds but does it really deliver? When you first step into a marketing role at an organization with few member insights, start with the data. Perhaps you have the tools to segment your audience to figure out who the organization’s biggest champion is, or the biggest user, or most profitable member group. We may start to repel members instead of attracting them.